EMS Documentation

EMS Documentation

1 / 15

It does not matter whether you have your partner read the PCR prior to submission

2 / 15

The pertinent negatives are as important as the pertinent positives when describing the chief complaint

3 / 15

When writing a PCR being comprehensive contradicts being as concise as possible

4 / 15

The prehospital provider needs to “paint as clear a picture as possible”

5 / 15

Patient refusals of evaluation, treatment, and/or transport account for 25% of prehospital EMS lawsuits?

6 / 15

Timely and accurate documentation helps provides evidence in the event should the prehospital provider is exposed to infectious agent or violence

7 / 15

Developing your documentation skills are as important as any other patient care skill

8 / 15

The terms “competent” and “capacity” are essential when assessing whether the patient can refuse care

9 / 15

The “Hand-off” of the patient is a low risk period and there is no need to document the last set of vital signs

10 / 15

The credibility of the prehospital provider can be called into question when the vital signs are the same

11 / 15

All of the following are essential to writing a good PCR except:

12 / 15

All of the following are reasons that EMS providers need to document accurately

13 / 15

EMS documentation should not be thought of as the provider’s “substituted memory”

14 / 15

Prehospital providers assert that nobody reads their PCRs and therefore it is acceptable to have less than complete, accurate or timely documentation. The case DeTarquino versus the City of Jersey City (NJ) in 2002 provides evidence that this is far from the truth?

15 / 15

The EMS PCR is first and foremost a clinical document

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